New Mailing List of Events Managers in Large UK Companies

List focuses on client companies with dedicated events budgets

Google “events managers” and get the names of thousands of people working in events.  If you are selling to events managers, it looks as if you have a wide target market and hitting your sales figures will be stress-free.

But start contacting those events managers and find that it is one of those job titles that carries different responsibilities depending on the industry sector.  Large hotels have events managers but they focus on selling the hotel as a venue to wedding organisers and training companies.  Travel companies have events managers and their role is to target groups of people travelling to an event such as an international football match. All large venues, whether sports stadium or arts complex host events and the person running this is the events manager.

Those events managers do not buy in any services; their focus is revenue, sales and client servicing. Much like yours in fact.

If you are researching a mailing list of events managers, you are probably looking for a person who buys in event services; the person who chooses the venue, the caterers, the AV supplier, print, furniture, flowers, travel, hotels and all the extras that contribute to a successful event.

Electric Marketing‘s new list of events managers focuses on corporate event managers. We have weeded out the events managers working in venues, marketing agencies and trade organisations. We have excluded the charity sector and companies which organise events as their main source of revenue.

Our list of 400 events managers features companies with a turnover of over £30m. It is a targeted list that aims to bring you new business by focusing on the right sort of events managers which, as ever, are the types with a budget to spend.

 

 

 

New Mailing Lists of Companies Paying The Apprenticeship Levy

There has been a fair bit of low-level grumbling about the Apprenticeship Levy from the big beasts of UK plc.

Payable by any company with an annual wages bill of £3m+, the Apprenticeship Levy has joined Brexit as the go to excuse for a CEO offering a sticky profits warning to shareholders.

But many companies have embraced the the change; they are not just taking on apprentices, they have developed formal apprenticeship programmes and had their in-house programmes accredited as apprenticeship training providers.

These companies running in-house schemes feature on our new lists of Apprenticeship Levy Employers.  With every apprentice contracted to spend 20% of their time in off-the-job training, these companies seem likely to spend their Apprenticeship Levy funds buying in training.

Mailing lists of companies who take training, learning and employee development seriously.

 

 

 

What Does A Falling £ Mean For B2B Marketers?

Following the events of last summer, the Pound crashed against the US Dollar to a 30 year low. The UK’s manufactured goods and services are falling in price for shoppers in the EU and across the world.

It follows that UK companies which export are set for a few years of strong sales growth. With growth comes new opportunities for b2b marketers to sell into these exporters as they gear up for expansion by investing in recruitment and training, marketing, market research into international markets, IT, international financial services and many other corporate services.

While many UK corporates are now drawing up plans to increase their exports, there are some companies which are ahead of the game. Electric Marketing has compiled new b2b mailing lists of companies which grew their exports by more than 10% last year. These companies are already showing strong sales growth and the new economic environment of a low pound and Brexit can only improve their prospects.

B2B marketers can buy data on fast-growing exporters in the knowledge that these target companies have insulated themselves against the chilly effects of Brexit and whatever the UK economy has in store for us.

New Mailing Lists of Fast Growing Companies

In May 2016, Companies House reported that there were 3,725,232 companies registered in the UK. Though many will be dormant, non-trading or too small to buy your goods and services, business marketers must decide on the best corporate targets and take aim. Electric Marketing has long offered targeted mailing lists by job title, industry sector, company size and postcode.

This week we add a new mailing list selection, companies experiencing a high growth rate. We think these companies are excellent targets for your new business campaigns. Each one demonstrating an annual growth rate of 10% and above, they are likely to be fizzing with new ideas, have ambitious plans and be willing to invest in their business to push it to meet its full potential.

As they meet fresh challenges thrown up by their high growth rate, they rapidly staff up, skill up and buy in expertise from consultants and advisers. These companies make timely purchasing decisions.

Crucially, they are less likely to have long term relationships and loyalties to current suppliers and are more receptive to new partners and fresh proposals. Change is key to building a business and adapting to their fast-moving working environment.

The mailing lists show a bias to tech firms and around one third of the companies are technology driven, some in cutting edge areas such as cloud computing, fintech and online trading platforms.

If you would like to be involved with these bright stars of the UK’s corporate universe, full contact details (postal address, email address and phone numbers) are available to buy for your email marketing, telemarketing or mailing campaigns.

 

25 Years In Business-to-Business Database Marketing

Top 5 Tips To Get Best Value From Your Marketing Lists

It’s, ahem, 25 years since I sold the first subscriptions to Marketing Appointments to a handful of advertising and design agencies. You don’t need to know everything I’ve learned about mailing lists, business data and marketing information. But knowing how to get the best value from our marketing lists, that is useful. Here’s five points for b2b marketers that can’t be said often enough.

 

  1. The best performing list is one that contains companies with a similar profile to your current client list. If you buy a mailing list and it contains the names of people and companies with whom you are already doing business, this is a good sign. Don’t waste your time grumbling that 3 people on the list of 100 names are already clients, get on with contacting the other 97 in the happy knowledge that these are good prospects.

 

  1. Social media is great but unless your tweets and FB posts are being read by your target audience, it won’t bring in the sales. Use mailing lists to identify your target readership, find those prospects on Twitter and LinkedIn and communicate with them directly.  Follow people on Twitter and get yourself noticed by writing some interesting tweets. Most Tweeters receive an email each time they attract a new follower, which puts your company name in their inbox, just by clicking the ‘follow’ button.

 

  1. In times of mass emailing clogging up the executive inbox, you need to stay on good terms with your prospects and clients. Figure out how often people can bear to hear from you. Think of something new to say or a new way of saying your old message. Bashing out the same copy to the same people every week wins you no fans, just a whole bunch of unsubscribes.

 

  1. Many executives have their inbox security set to ‘very high’ to screen out unwanted emails. Email sent to these people will bounce back to you as ‘identified as spam’ or ’email unavailable’. Put these email addresses in a separate file and write an email specifically formulated to get a very low spam score and to get past their spam filter. Keep it short, keep links to a minimum and keep it text only. See here for more tips on keeping your e-shots out of the filters’ way.

 

  1. ReMail. You have bought a list from Electric Marketing. Don’t just use it once, get your money’s worth and email it again. You can send an initial email, follow it up a fortnight or month later, look the person up on social media and make contact, write a letter, send a brochure or pick up the phone. You’ve got the data, use it while it’s current.  ReMailing works.

How Many Is Too Many?: Using Email Lists Effectively And Sensibly

‘How often can I use the mailing list?’ can be the first question a new client asks Electric Marketing.

We don’t restrict the use of our mailing lists: it’s your marketing campaign, you are running the show. But to get the best value from an email list and to be able to use it over and over, we recommend that you limit emailing your cold prospects to once a month.

Business-to-business email marketers must be alive to their ‘unsubscribe’ rate. UK law states that you can send emails to business people on business matters but if they ask you not to contact them again or ‘unsubscribe’, you must not email that person again.  Each ‘unsubscribe’ is a prospect that you cannot email again. Ever.

To get best value from your email marketing list, keep the unsubscribes to a minimum so that your list of 1,000 marketing managers does not deteriorate to 900 email addresses after the first week.

One of the top reasons people give for requesting to be removed from the Electric Marketing database, is that they receive too many emails. If a prospect feels that your emails are filling up their inbox, they will seek out your unsubscribe button and launch themselves off your email list.

In tests, we have found that an email campaign to a fresh list of cold prospects can expect an unsubscribe rate of 0.5%.  Email that same list one month later and we receive the same unsubscribe rate. But email the same list two weeks later and the second email generated 1% of unsubscribe notices and we note, more strident language.  By emailing twice a month, so 24 times in one year, your email list shrinks at twice the rate.

‘People don’t unsubscribe because they do not want to hear from you, they unsubscribe because they know what you are offering.’

If your email marketing serves to remind businesses that you are still eager to do business with them, it is likely that you don’t have anything different to offer from last week.  You wouldn’t write to a business every week saying pretty much the same thing, why treat email differently on the basis that it is cheap to do so?  We recommend that you email your cold prospects no more than once a month for up to a year.  After a year of emails, it is likely that you will have to reach out to them by phone, post or social media and admit defeat on email. A quick phone call might reveal that they are not the right person in the company to make the decision.

No busy decision maker reads every email that arrives instantly.  Time management best practice dictates that successful business people filter emails into what is urgent and to be dealt with immediately, then maybe emails to be filed and then emails that are interesting and to read later. Realistically no senior decision maker will place an approach from a new supplier in the ‘must read now’ file.  Your first email should aim to be in the ‘read and consider later’ file. Give your prospect time to read your email.  It is probably best not to badger them with emails twice a week until they ask you to stop.

For email lists of busy decision makers in large companies see our page of email lists of directors and decision makers

 

De-duping & Appending Mailing Lists: What Exactly Will You Do With My Marketing Data?

Last month we talked about how using de-duping and appending services can refresh your mailing lists, cutting down on marketing costs every time you email the list.

This time, more detail on the different ways of updating a mailing list.

Below is a four-step process we can follow with your marketing data and you can bow out of the process at any point, thereby controlling your spend but always ending up with a better list than when you started.

1. First up is the cheapest: verifying at 5p per contact. You email over your data, we run it against our up-to-date mailing lists and are left with two files. The first is of data that we know to be correct; the second is of data that did not match our own and so may be incorrect. We put the first file aside as ‘good data’.

2. We run the second file of suspect data against our Leavers Database, a database of 150,000 company directors and managers who have left a job since 2007. This cuts the file down to size again and is charged at 5p per removed contact. We know these contacts are incorrect, so these are discarded. You might consider telephone research to update these records, if your campaign deadlines and marketing budget allow.

3. Missing data fields; if the mailing list file is missing contact names, email addresses or phone numbers, we can add those in. Price 40p per new contact name. Or if we do not have the missing names, we can telephone the companies and research the new contact for you for £1.50 per name.

4. More contacts please: by now your file is looking fitter but smaller and is probably missing some key players. Brief us on the types of companies and job titles you are looking for and we’ll run a search on our database. We’ll find extra contacts that fit your brief. Naturally, we’ll run our data against yours so that you only pay for the new contacts added. Price 40p per addition.

So what are the downsides to this process. Firstly we are only using computers. No de-dupe software can pick up every error that your own human eye can pick up. The question is, would you rather wade through the data yourself, or give the job to a computer? A human eye, a sharp telephone researcher and a data inputter will get you closer to your perfect list, but will take far more time and budget.

There is no such thing as the perfect list (even if you do the work yourself). If you are a perfectionist, use a de-duping and appending service as a starting point and then scrutinise the data yourself, making corrections and taking out people and companies that you do not wish to contact, before you use it. At this point you might hire someone to telephone research the list for you. We can do this for £1.50 per contact.

Our final (and most popular) option is a complete file update. If you’ve bought a mailing list from us within the previous 12 months, you can ask for the same specification and pay a reduced price:

List bought within last 6 months 75% discount of total price

List bought within last 12 months 50% discount of total price.

Our page on de-duping and appending mailing lists gives you more details. Or to take us up on any of these data services, call David Evans on 020 7419 7999 or email lists@electricmarketing.co.uk

 

Mailing Lists of the UK’s Largest Companies; Which Companies Really Are In The UK’s Top 100?

How should you define the largest companies in the UK? By annual sales? By numbers of staff? Or do you go by the London Stock Exchange definition and buy a mailing list of the FTSE 100?

How you define your top 100 companies should depend on who you are contacting within the company and the product you are marketing. If you are targeting marketing directors, finance directors and CEOs, choose a list of the companies with the highest annual sales; generally speaking, the higher the turnover, the larger the purchasing budget.

But if you are selling to the HR, training, facilities or IT departments, buy a mailing list where companies are ranked by the number of people they employ. The more people it employs, the greater the budget for training courses, HR software, workstations, IT consumables, vehicles, property services and facilities to serve all those people working on the company’s premises every day.

Why not use the Stock Market rankings? The financial press ranks companies by market capitalisation which is share price multiplied by number of shares issued. This method excludes too many companies which you would expect to find on a list of the Top 100 Companies. For instance it excludes all privately owned companies, such as Mars Inc, all partnerships such as John Lewis, PwC, Eversheds plus all those companies that run huge operations in the UK but are listed on stock markets overseas such as Apple, Hitachi or McDonald’s.

Financial rankings do include a large number of mining companies, with operations in Africa, Asia and Russia which are using the London Stock Market to raise capital. These companies have very small head offices in the UK, staffed by a handful of people who are not responsible for the company’s main operations and purchasing. The FTSE 100 is no longer a list of UK blue-chip companies.

We’ve compiled our own lists of the UK’s Top 100 Companies.

First we’ve ranked the companies by annual sales and below that, by the number of people they employ.

We use these lists as the basis for our mailing lists of the Top 1,000 Companies. Find out more about our lists of the key players in the UK’s largest 1,000 companies here