Electric Marketing Blog

Planning To Capitalise On Brexit?

Target The UK’s Importers And Exporters With These Mailing Lists

Whatever the outcome of the General Election, both Labour and Tories have committed to leave the EU. While smaller, nimbler companies can afford a “wait and see” approach, the UK’s largest corporates are making plans, and contingency plans, to change how they operate, no matter what the much-talked of “Brexit deal” will be.

Pretty much all companies will eventually go through a process of adjustment post-Brexit; the UK’s importers and exporters will likely get there first.

These companies are examining their supply chains, pricing imports from outside the EU, looking at currency exchange rates, comparing transport and logistics costs, identifying possible regulatory changes and gathering information on what opportunities lie for them outside the EU.

Maybe you already have products and services to help companies working through this period of change? Or are you developing services to offer companies reassessing their export markets post-Brexit?

The government website uktradeinfo.com has helpfully published a list of companies which have imported goods into the UK and a similar list of exporters. As well as hosts of micro businesses importing and exporting small amounts, you can see the UK’s largest companies currently engaging in international trade.

Electric Marketing has taken the government information and enhanced it so that you can use it for business-to-business e-marketing campaigns to importers and exporters. We have appended addresses, phone numbers, email addresses and contact names of directors and senior managers to the government list of companies. These new importexport mailing lists can be used to target companies who are likely to be planning for a successful Brexit.

 

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Looking For A Client Who Is The Next Big Thing?

Mailing Lists Of Innovative & Disruptive Companies

Our new mailing lists feature companies who are pioneers in their field: young, ambitious start-ups, companies with an invention to bring to market and companies with new ways of working.

Why go after these companies? Apart from the excitement of working with innovative, passionate teams? Apart from being in at the beginning with a future star and all the financial rewards that could bring?

Many of these companies are, at present, operating under the radar of your competitors. They are not on the lists that everyone else is using. And so they are not fielding approaches from your rivals every week.

We’ve called them ‘innovators and disruptors‘. They are not the easiest people to contact: many of them don’t have a budget for a receptionist to pick up the phone, their postal address isn’t on their website and the best way to contact them can be email or social media.

But if you are targeting companies which break the mould, expect a corporate culture which bends towards non-conformist.

We’ve compiled these lists by tracking press reports, articles on ‘ones-to-watch’ and top 20 innovators tables.

We have excluded the really early days companies who are still renting desks in a hub or incubator with only mobile numbers to contact them. These companies are still refining their offer and do not yet have budgets for services of a typical Electric Marketing client.

The mailing lists of disruptors and innovators identify companies with significant investment behind them or have already secured a client-base, and are now building teams and a future as a serious player in their field.

If you are looking for new clients who could bring you big rewards in the future, take a look at these business mailing lists.

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Information Commissioner promises new post-Brexit UK data protection laws

The uncertainty over the future of the UK’s data protection laws looks set to continue.

In her first speech in her five-year term as Information Commissioner, Elizabeth Denham has acknowledged that when the UK leaves the EU in 2019 or later, there will need to be new UK data protection legislation.

One thing that is certain is that the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will apply to all EU member states from 25 May 2018. All UK companies that wish to do business in the EU after that date will need to comply with GDPR.

However Denham says that it is up to the UK Government to decide what data protection rules apply to companies that only operate in the UK ‘both in that middle period from May 2018 to whenever the UK formally leaves the EU, and beyond’.

She adds ‘We’d all like a concrete answer about the specific outlines of post-Brexit data protection law. We know businesses don’t generally like uncertainty. But in the end, it’s Government that will have to decide’.

Denham says that she is in active discussions with ministers and senior government officials on post-Brexit UK data protection legislation, which she believes should be ‘developed on an evolutionary basis, to provide a degree of stability and clear regulatory messages for data controllers and the public’.

Let’s hope the Government consults with all interested parties, including the direct marketing industry, to ensure that the new data protection legislation is sensible and workable.

After all, whatever else Brexit may mean, it must mean an end to excessive bureaucracy if the British economy is to thrive in the coming years.

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What Does A Falling £ Mean For B2B Marketers?

Following the events of the summer, the Pound has crashed against the US Dollar to a 30 year low. The UK’s manufactured goods and services are falling in price for shoppers in the EU and across the world.

It follows that UK companies which export are set for a few years of strong sales growth. With growth comes new opportunities for b2b marketers to sell into these exporters as they gear up for expansion by investing in recruitment and training, marketing, market research into international markets, IT, international financial services and many other corporate services.

While many UK corporates are now drawing up plans to increase their exports, there are some companies which are ahead of the game. Electric Marketing has compiled new b2b mailing lists of companies which grew their exports by more than 10% last year. These companies are already showing strong sales growth and the new economic environment of a low pound and Brexit can only improve their prospects.

B2B marketers can buy data on fast-growing exporters in the knowledge that these target companies have insulated themselves against the chilly effects of Brexit and whatever the UK economy has in store for us.

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New Mailing Lists of Fast Growing Companies

In May 2016, Companies House reported that there were 3,725,232 companies registered in the UK. Though many will be dormant, non-trading or too small to buy your goods and services, business marketers must decide on the best corporate targets and take aim. Electric Marketing has long offered targeted mailing lists by job title, industry sector, company size and postcode.

This week we add a new mailing list selection, companies experiencing a high growth rate. We think these companies are excellent targets for your new business campaigns. Each one demonstrating an annual growth rate of 10% and above, they are likely to be fizzing with new ideas, have ambitious plans and be willing to invest in their business to push it to meet its full potential.

As they meet fresh challenges thrown up by their high growth rate, they rapidly staff up, skill up and buy in expertise from consultants and advisers. These companies make timely purchasing decisions.

Crucially, they are less likely to have long term relationships and loyalties to current suppliers and are more receptive to new partners and fresh proposals. Change is key to building a business and adapting to their fast-moving working environment.

The mailing lists show a bias to tech firms and around one third of the companies are technology driven, some in cutting edge areas such as cloud computing, fintech and online trading platforms.

If you would like to be involved with these bright stars of the UK’s corporate universe, full contact details (postal address, email address and phone numbers) are available to buy for your email marketing, telemarketing or mailing campaigns.

 

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Email Marketing To Corporate Sponsors of Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games

It’s hard to ignore the international events in the sporting calendar this summer. Football, rugby, cricket and the biggest of them all, the Olympic Games.  Although sponsoring the Olympics requires budgets that only the multi-nationals can muster; there are different levels of sponsorship so that the host country’s major companies can benefit from worldwide exposure.

At the top of the budgetary tree there are ‘worldwide Olympic partners’: the truly global megabrands who sponsor the Olympic Games every time it comes round: Atos, Bridgestone, Coca-Cola, Dow, GE, McDonalds, Omega, Panasonic, Procter & Gamble, Samsung, Visa.

The second tier are ‘official sponsors of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games’. These are big brands in Brazil: the bank Bradesco and its insurance arm Bradesco Seguros; Brazil’s state owned postal service Correios; Brazil’s large internet and phone provider NET; mobile operator CLARO; telecom operator Embratel (part of the same America Movil group as CLARO) and finally, a familiar name, Nissan.

Next up are the ten ‘official supporters’ of the games; the only companies with a presence in the UK on this list are EY and Cisco. Others include Aliansce Shopping Centres, Estacio, Globo, Sadia, Qualy, Skql, Latam Airlines and 361.

After that 30 ‘official suppliers’ to the Rio Olympics; Airbnb, C&A, Eventim, Karcher, Microsoft, Nike, Nielsen, Symantec are in this division.

Of course every team has its own set of sponsors; Team GB has ‘official partners’ in Adidas, Aldi, BP, Deloitte, DFS, Fitness First, Kellogg’s, Muller and Nissan. Official suppliers to Team GB are Jet Set Sports, Krow Communications,  Ocean Outdoor and Simon Jersey.

We’ve put all of these generous sponsors together in a series of mailing lists, divided as always by job title. Our thinking is that these sponsors have allocated big budgets to be spent during the Games and have a limited time in which to spend them. A targeted approach at the right time could see a small chunk of that budget heading your way.

The Olympic fortnight starts on Friday 5 August, followed by the Paralympic Games running from 7-19 September.

 

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B2B Marketing To Corporate Sponsors In The Summer Of Sport

Summer of sport has begun with European Football, next week it’s Wimbledon and the Rio Olympics starts on 5 August. Hundreds of companies have paid to sponsor the events, the teams and the players.

But if you haven’t paid to be an official sponsor, beware of trying to associate your brand with sporting events. Firstly, the sporting event brands themselves police sponsorship very closely; the chicken shop in Stratford that rebranded itself Olympic Chicken in 2012 was short-lived.

Secondly, avoid tortuous connections in your email marketing. The eshot that begun ‘With Valentines Day fast-approaching, now is the perfect time to buy a new toner cartridge’ was mocked and swiftly deleted. Not many b2b companies can claim a real connection to a big sporting event so it might be best to leave that to consumer brands. This is the time to be in takeaway pizzas and big TVs.

Electric Marketing was asked for mailing lists of the companies who are official sponsors of international sporting events. It follows that if there is a sponsorship budget for the European Football, there must be a big marketing and promotions budget surrounding it. If you can make this work for you, we now have lists of sports sponsors.

There are different levels of corporate sponsorship; the ten global sponsors of the UEFA 2016 football championship are Adidas, Carlsberg, Coca-Cola, Continental Tyres, Hisense (Chinese electronics giant), Hyundai-Kia, McDonald’s, Orange, SOCAR and Turkish Airlines.

Although national teams are not permitted to display sponsors’ logos on their shirts, Vauxhall sponsors England, Northern Ireland and Wales national teams. The England team have an official supermarket sponsor (Lidl), their suits come from sponsors Marks & Spencer and Panini is the official sticker provider. There are many more companies involved in sponsoring the teams in the Euro 16 Football and still more in the Rio Olympics.

These sponsors will have allocated big budgets to be spent during these events and have a very limited time in which to spend them. The right approach at the right time could see a small chunk of that budget heading your way.

To access the mailing lists of companies actively involved in the business side of this summer’s sports, see our website page dedicated to mailing lists of UK sports sponsors.

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Mailing List Selections: Put Yourself In Your Prospect’s Shoes

When should you choose to select your list by both employee size and annual turnover?

Generally our advice is not to do this. Pick just one.

Choose employee size if you are selling something relevant for companies whose business relies on having a lot of staff eg, payroll software, health and safety services, absentee management software, internal communications consulting, catering kit for staff restaurants.

Choose turnover for everything else. If you really must.

Let’s say you are buying a list of HR managers, it is largely irrelevant to specify that each company must have 15+ employees. Would you expect your prospect company to hire an HR manager to manage the HR issues for 14 people? It is likely that the MD and his assistant would handle this himself. But there are holding companies who run all the HR and finance for a group of companies. The group may have 200 employees as a whole, but the HR manager works for the holding company which employs 10 people. And by putting that 15+ employees restriction in, your mailing list excludes those group HR managers. There is no accounting for complex corporate structures.

This selection strategy works if you are certain that your mailing list company is selling you people with the job title HR manager, rather than ‘managers responsible for HR’ which will almost certainly include director’s PAs and office managers. Electric Marketing only offers lists by job title. If you ask for HR managers, you will have a list of HR managers.

It is a good idea to ask yourself if you really need to limit your campaign by company size. If you have specified a job title which is only likely to feature among the largest companies, say Corporate Social Responsibility Manager, Facilities Manager or Head of Business Intelligence, it is largely irrelevant to specify that the companies must have annual sales of £10m+. Put yourself in the shoes of the managing director of a company with annual sales of under £10m? Would you hire a CSR manager? The fact that a company has a dedicated CSR manager is a clear indication that they are a large company with a CSR budget.

It is only by looking at company accounts that mailing list companies can get info on company financials and companies with a turnover below £5m are not legally required to put the number of employees they have in their company accounts. Companies House requires simple unaudited accounts from small companies. By specifying turnover, you will exclude all the companies which do not publish their UK sales figures: US companies tend to publish a figure for European sales and do not split it out by country. By selecting by turnover your mailing list will exclude these multinational companies.

If you really must target companies by their size, select companies by turnover. Mailing list companies are more likely to have this information. And as a reliable guide to available budgets, look at the job titles of the companies you are targeting. If a company has hired three marketing managers to manage and spend its marketing budget, it is likely to be a decent-sized budget.

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Information Commissioner issues new guidance for direct marketing

On 26 March 2016 the Information Commissioner issued new guidance on Data Protection and Privacy & Electronic Communications Regulations for direct marketing.

The full guidance can be read here https://ico.org.uk/media/for-organisations/documents/1555/direct-marketing-guidance.pdf but we’ve extracted the sections for business-to-business marketing and they are shown below:

Business-to-business texts and emails

1. Rules on consent, the soft opt-in and the right to opt out do not apply to electronic marketing messages sent to ‘corporate subscribers’ which means companies and other corporate bodies eg limited liability partnerships, Scottish partnerships, and government bodies. The only requirement is that the sender must identify itself and provide contact details.

2. However, it serves little purpose to send unsolicited marketing messages to those who have gone to the trouble of saying they do not want to receive them.

3. Corporate subscribers do not include sole traders and some partnerships who instead have the same protection as individuals. If an organisation does not know whether a business is a corporate body or not, it cannot be sure which rules apply. Therefore we strongly recommend that organisations respect requests from any business not to email them.

4. In addition, many employees have personal corporate email addresses (eg firstname.lastname@org.co.uk), and individual employees will have a right under section 11 of the DPA to stop any marketing being sent to that type of email address.

Business-to-business calls

1. Sole traders and partnerships may register their numbers with the Telephone Preference Service (TPS) in the same way as individual consumers, while companies and other corporate bodies register with the Corporate Telephone Preference Service (CTPS). So organisations making business-to-business marketing calls will need to screen against both the TPS and CTPS registers.

The right to opt out

1. Organisations must not make unsolicited marketing calls to a person who has said that they don’t want those calls. In other words, there is a right to opt out, and organisations cannot call someone who has objected to or opted out of marketing calls.
Organisations should not make it difficult to opt out, for example by asking individuals to complete a form or confirm in writing. As soon as an individual has clearly said that they don’t want the calls, they must stop.

2. If an individual objects or opts out at any time, their details should be suppressed as soon as possible. It is important not to simply delete their details entirely, otherwise there is no way of ensuring that the organisation does not call them again.

3. Organisations must not send marketing texts or emails to an individual who has said they do not want to receive them. Individuals have a right to opt out of receiving marketing at any time. Organisations must comply with any written objections promptly to comply with the DPA – but even if there is no written objection, as soon as an individual says they don’t want the texts or emails, this will override any existing consent or soft opt-in under PECR and they must stop.

4. Organisations must not make it difficult to opt out, for example by asking individuals to complete a form or confirm in writing. It is good practice to allow the individual to respond directly to the message – in other words, to use the same simple method as required for the soft opt-in. In any event, as soon as an individual has clearly said that they don’t want the texts or emails, the organisation must stop, even if the individual hasn’t used its preferred method of communication.

5. If an individual objects or opts out at any time, their details should be suppressed from marketing lists as soon as possible. It is important not to simply delete their details entirely, otherwise there is no way of ensuring that the organisation does not contact them again.

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NEW Mailing List of Living Wage Employers

We’ve compiled a new mailing list of companies  signed up to pay their staff the Living Wage and who support the Living Wage Foundation. Signalling a commitment to employee wellbeing and a progressive HR vision, the companies on this mailing list are more likely to invest in HR, people development, learning and internal communications to cement a reputation as an ethical employer.

What does it mean to sign up to the Living Wage?

All UK companies are obliged to pay workers aged 25 and above the National Living Wage, an hourly rate of £7.20 (The rate for workers aged 21-24 is £6.70 per hour, and for 18-20 year olds it is £5.30 per hour). The Living Wage Foundation has set a higher wage, the Living Wage which is calculated so that anyone with a job is not living in poverty. The companies who sign up to the Living Wage Foundation commit to pay all their staff aged 18 and over (including contractors), a minimum of £8.25 an hour (£9.40 in London).  Financially, it is a big commitment but the campaign has attracted companies large and small; Aviva, Barclays, Burberry, Channel 4, ClearChannel, GSK, ITV, KPMG, Legal & General, Linklaters and Santander are significant supporters of the Living Wage Foundation which campaigns against in-work poverty.

Why sign up to the Living Wage?

These companies are highlighting their commitment to be fair employers who care about the lives of their staff outside the workplace.  Membership of the Living Wage Foundation is more than a component of a recruitment and retention strategy; organisations are seeking to distance themselves from rival corporates who look to be out to make profits at any cost and some maybe making amends for past corporate misdemeanours (there’s a fair few banks on the mailing list).

Why Might You Be Interested In Marketing To Living Wage Employers?

Unwilling to buy on price and not hiring the cheapest option, serious about CSR (corporate social responsibility) and wanting to be seen as ethical corporates who try to ‘do the right thing’: we think these companies are great b2b marketing prospects, and not just for HR and training companies. If your product offering has an ethical slant, why not consider a targeted email marketing campaign to the Living Wage Employers. Just as they are fair employers, they are more likely to be fair business partners too.

Mailing list of companies paying the Living Wage

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